North Fork of St. Vrain Creek – 04/11/2018

Time: 12:30PM – 2:00PM

Location: Below Buttonrock Dam

North Fork of St. Vrain Creek 04/11/2018 Photo Album

Wind. This four letter word sums up my fishing experience on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. I knew from reviewing the weather forecasts, that wind speeds up to 28 MPH were expected to invade Colorado on Wednesday and Thursday. I vacillated between cancelling my fishing plans and forging ahead, but in the end I settled on making a trip. I hedged my commitment by driving 1.25 hour to the North Fork of St. Vrain Creek northwest of Lyons. If the conditions were not tolerable, I could at least minimize my drive time.

I arrived at the parking lot below the entrance to the dirt lane that provides access to the North Fork tailwater by 11:45AM. I could see the tree limbs waving and the frequent dust clouds caused by the blasts of warm air, so I decided to eat my lunch in the protected comfort of the car before enduring the gale that was sure to greet me. Finally after finishing my yogurt cup, I brace myself and opened the door. Sure enough a steady stream of forceful air greeted me, but I pressed on under the largely hopeful belief, that I could cast my flies during the intermittent gaps. The wind could not gust constantly, could it?

I rigged my Sage four weight since it is a stiff fast action rod, and I needed the rigid backbone to counteract the wind. The air temperature was surprisingly comfortable, as the dashboard displayed sixty-six degrees. I wore my gray fleece over my fishing shirt, but I discovered that I could have easily fished without the extra layer. I hiked up the road for fifteen minutes, and I was forced to turn my back to the gusts on a regular basis.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Te04R7Bq1qg/Ws6c6NqYiSI/AAAAAAABbGY/y_tuHd8Bbv4M24K6_L15FlvqWLZZRX2hACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P4110021.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6543339829080804081#6543339832529684770″ caption=”Starting Pool Yielded a Small Fish” type=”image” alt=”P4110021.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

When I approached the inlet to Longmont Reservoir, I walked for another one hundred yards, and then I cut over to the stream. The water was on the low side at 25 CFS and very clear, and this dictated long casts and cautious approaches. Long casts into a ferocious headwind was a difficult challenge to say the least. I knotted a yellow fat Albert to my line along with a beadhead hares ear and salvation nymph, and I launch a long cast to the tail of a small marginal run. Miraculously a small brown trout nipped the trailing salvation, but I was caught off guard by this instant action and set the hook a fraction of a second too late.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-kZ-z4VapyRM/Ws6c6BV0gZI/AAAAAAABbGY/BVoSO3oCSCsAC4IikzyDUv3TJ-qkPvEiQCCoYBhgL/s144-o/P4110022.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6543339829080804081#6543339829222211986″ caption=”Lovely Run and Pool” type=”image” alt=”P4110022.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

The next pool was larger and deeper, and two small brown trout latched on to the salvation, and I was in a state of shock. Of course the brown trout were barely seven inches, but the rapid fire response to my nymphs was quite encouraging. I proceeded with heightened optimism and moved upstream to a point just above an old concrete dam or diversion structure, and I added two additional browns to the fish counter. The last fish that found a home in my net stretched to nine inches, and I paused to snap a photo of the wind aided trophy.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9rDR9GMMm2k/Ws6dMA2CQiI/AAAAAAABbGY/wzmmPdlERoU50Y4-29ksDTVc3StmNQrRACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P4110025.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6543339829080804081#6543340138326540834″ caption=”Home of Best of the Day” type=”image” alt=”P4110025.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-fM4hvc8xk8M/Ws6dMD4cgDI/AAAAAAABbGY/mhicYKw6ohgvGDJsCLvpJr5GmxeSq_NKgCCoYBhgL/s144-o/P4110024.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6543339829080804081#6543340139141955634″ caption=”Best of the Day” type=”image” alt=”P4110024.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

The section between the concrete structure and the ninety degree bend consisted of huge boulders and a sequence of deep plunge pools. Perhaps it was the topography or maybe just timing, but the wind blasts peaked during my final thirty minutes. I spent more time holding my hat with my back to the creek, than I spent casting the flies. Had the fish rewarded me for my patience and persistence, I could have continued, but that was not the case, so I reeled up my flies and hooked them in the rod guide at 2:00PM.

I spotted several trout in one of the deep pools, but they were not paying attention to my offerings, although they seemed to shift from time to time, as if they were grabbing food from the drift. I thought I recognized two blue winged olives above the water surface, so I swapped the salvation for a sparkle wing RS2, and I dropped five casts into the relatively small eddy above the sighted fish. Perhaps the fish in front of me were nabbing active baetis nymphs? It was a great theory, but the change in flies did not end my fish catching slump.

I cut my losses and returned to the car with a fish tally of four. My sanity remained in place, and I enjoyed the silence and stillness inside my car on the return drive to Stapleton. In hindsight landing four trout in 1.5 hours of atmospheric turbulence was actually a notable achievement. Spring fishing can be quite variable, and Wednesday was a good example of the seasonal risk.

Fish Landed: 4

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