South Platte River – 05/17/2018

Time: 10:00AM – 3:30PM

Location: Eleven Mile Canyon

South Platte River 05/17/2018 Photo Album

When I reviewed the flows on several rivers and streams on Monday prior to my visit to the North Fork of St. Vrain Creek, I noted that all the tailwater sections of the South Platte River remained at excellent flow rates. One of the advantages of this blog is the ability to check back on fishing trips and conditions in previous years. I did just that on Wednesday, when I read my post of 05/12/2016. I recalled a spectacular day, and I was curious to remember the date, weather and flows. The weather was cool with air temperatures peaking in the sixties and the flows were 64 CFS. May 17 was five days later, and the high temperature was forecast to reach the low seventies, while the flows registered in the 85 CFS range. I concluded that these factors were close enough to 5/12/2016 to justify another trip to the South Platte River in an attempt to capture even a fraction of the success bestowed upon me during that day.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-hC8lZVckXDk/Wv77YDdnU0I/AAAAAAABc1c/bZAco8r8TGo0aEpM8ydQT-5FaMGLra99ACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170001.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954498162971458″ caption=”83 CFS” type=”image” alt=”P5170001.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

I assembled my Sage four weight rod and waded into the South Platte River by 10AM on Thursday morning. The air temperature was in the mid-sixties and the flows were as displayed on the DWR graph. The sky was deep blue and totally devoid of any clouds, and this held true for 90% of my time on the river. I could not have asked for a more ideal scenario; as I knotted a yellow fat Albert, beadhead hares ear, and salvation nymph to my line. I began tossing the three fly searching combination to the likely deep pockets and runs, as I methodically moved upstream. Very little time elapsed, before I landed a few small brown trout, and after fifteen minutes I built the fish count to five.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4lHKO6m3X88/Wv77YGNuzKI/AAAAAAABc3E/H0Qy7VaJO1EaiRFil6lFrCHDUSh5_tIgACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170005.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954498901658786″ caption=”Chunk of Butter” type=”image” alt=”P5170005.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ] [peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-S6JierRufns/Wv77YDQrYRI/AAAAAAABc3E/AI1PaTCrPFkZHmT_LVNHRd7roJuRPs_7gCCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170004.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954498108711186″ caption=”Such a Pretty Sight” type=”image” alt=”P5170004.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

My expectations soared, but my confidence was tested in the next fifteen minutes, as trout began to elevate and refuse the fat Albert. I endured this frustration for a bit, and then I pulled in my flies and replaced the fat Albert with a size 10 Chernboyl ant. The Chernobyl proved to be less of a distraction, and I began to hook and land trout at a regular pace. By eleven o’clock the tally of fish that rested in my net mounted to ten, and the salvation nymph generated two fish for every one produced by the hares ear.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-HRB0hRVvn2w/Wv77YKPTxeI/AAAAAAABc2w/n_nYyIsrm44Xq84ACWsi4gZPU7MvITcVACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170011.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954499982018018″ caption=”” type=”image” alt=”P5170011.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

Another hour elapsed, and I chose to eat my lunch on the east side of the river just below an island, where some large flat rocks served as reasonable replacements for tables and chairs. By this time the number of fish that slid into my net ballooned to twenty-one. In the process of landing two fish that favored the topmost fly, the salvation nymph broke off as a result of being dragged over an adjacent rock or stick. I was reluctant to deplete the supply of salvations in my fleece wallet, so after lunch I experimented with several alternatives.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-C2M682NHYN0/Wv77YOIigQI/AAAAAAABc2w/iL-WXChheWMcYsbZOxzTmBgXLAoBd984ACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170013.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954501027365122″ caption=”Long and Lean” type=”image” alt=”P5170013.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

I prospected the smaller left side channel next to the island first, and I began with an amber March brown nymph below the hares ear nymph. Periodically I enjoy trying some of my legacy flies from my early days of fly tying and fishing in Pennsylvania. Unfortunately on May 17, the South Platte River trout ignored the classic, and I once again paused to exchange it for a nymph; that contained a glass bead, pheasant tail body and marabou tail. This fly performed slightly better, as it accounted for one fish, but during its stint on the line I also experienced two long distance releases. I sensed that my catch rate was slowing, so I once again stripped in my line and made another change. I swapped the glass bead nymph for an ultra zug bug; and the Chernboyl ant, hares ear, and ultra zug bug became my stalwarts for the remainder of the day.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-wqXT63uNAes/Wv77YCyR1kI/AAAAAAABc2w/zv39_eNg8io3IOesUDPE9umpzxWY613YwCCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170014.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954497981208130″ caption=”One of the Better Fish on the Day” type=”image” alt=”P5170014.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

Seven additional trout materialized from the east channel next to the island. The flows in the left braid were only one fourth of the volume that churned down the right channel, so this condition necessitated stealth and long casts. When I reached the upstream tip of the island, I climbed the bank and circled back to the bottom point, and then I migrated up the larger and faster right branch. At the tip of the island I progressed through additional attractive pocket water that carried the full combined flows of the river, and I finally quit at 3:30. The two hours between 1:30 and 3:30 evolved into a fish catching spree, as I pushed the fish count from twenty-eight to forty-seven.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-oiQQpGUaxl0/Wv77YNx6GRI/AAAAAAABc2w/qPbLjjm-KysH0lXLrfzujVCumg6GFdufQCCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170020.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954500932442386″ caption=”Oh Those Deep Pockets” type=”image” alt=”P5170020.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

The most productive water types were slow moving shelf pools next to faster currents. A cast to the seam was a solid bet. Across and downstream drifts along the bank also provoked aggressive grabs, if the water depth was sufficient. During the two hour period of fast action, I surprisingly extracted some decent brown trout from fairly shallow riffles. Two thirteen inch rainbow trout joined the mix in the afternoon, and they crushed the ultra zug bug from positions in faster currents. Three decent brown trout smashed the Chernobyl ant in another surprise afternoon development.

[peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-tMV6V1z44xM/Wv77YFXc-6I/AAAAAAABc2w/ianjl_SanE81o5fYGQ6CTLbAqd6WVbafgCCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170024.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954498673998754″ caption=”Fine Spots. Might Be Cutbow.” type=”image” alt=”P5170024.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ] [peg-image src=”https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-YbeVastmmhc/Wv77YLdQaII/AAAAAAABc2w/oKrJlVWiseo97UZPbt3hVcrAKU18ZKdIACCoYBhgL/s144-o/P5170021.JPG” href=”https://picasaweb.google.com/108128655430094950653/6556954494977468145#6556954500308953218″ caption=”” type=”image” alt=”P5170021.JPG” image_size=”4608×3456″ ]

Thursday evolved into another outstanding adventure on the South Platte River. It did not quite measure up to 05/12/2016, but that may have been a lifetime best event. While freestone rivers swelled and dams opened their valves, I fished in nearly ideal flows and thoroughly enjoyed my day in May.

Fish Landed: 47

 

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